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Intro

Foreward

It was the signer-songwriter Billy Joel who said “You can get what you want or you can just get old”*. Your young person’s transition to adulthood is probably the most challenging and exciting time of their whole lives. It is the time when you can do the most to help, but probably when you need the most help too if you are to ensure the best for them.

This section of the Local Offer, ‘Preparing for Adulthood’, has been designed by professionals in education, health and social care so that you have the advice you might need in one place to help your young person gain access to assistance throughout the years that will see them to adulthood. We remember that it is their journey, however much we want to help or they need our help.

I am proud to be able to write this short forward to what I hope you will use for reference over the coming weeks, month and years. I am proud of the work that has gone into it by so many who standby to offer advice when it is needed. The services provided to support our young people into adulthood have been a focus for me since becoming a councillor. I believe that this information means that we are in a better position to deliver what is needed and when than ever before.

I wish you good luck and enjoyment helping your young person get what they want.

Julien

Councillor Julien Parrott

Executive Lead for Adults and Children, Torbay Council

Introduction

The transition into adulthood from 14 to 18 years of age is an important time in the lives of young people. Professionals from special educational needs, health and social care in Children’s and Adult services in Torbay, have come together to create this ‘Preparing for Adulthood’ guidance for young people with special education needs and disabilities. We hope that this will give you useful information about who may give you support, how they can help your young person, and when they may become involved.

Throughout the transitions process (and beyond) the young person’s own strengths and capabilities will be taken into consideration. Thought will also be given to what assistance might be available from the young persons’ wider support network or within the community that could help the person to achieve their goals. This strength-based approach will protect the individual’s independence and ability to make choices; it will be the ‘golden thread’ that runs through the interactions between the health and social care teams and the people that they support.

The Importance of Involving young people in decision making

Preparing for Adulthood Outcomes