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Early Intervention in Psychosis - Berkshire Health Foundation Trust

We support people experiencing symptoms of psychosis for the first time, as well as people at risk of developing psychosis.

Psychosis affects the way someone believes, views and experiences things. It most commonly develops between late teens and early adulthood. Anyone can develop psychosis, and most people recover in less than six months with treatment and support. Early treatment increases the chance of a full recovery.

Early signs can sometimes be unclear and hardly noticeable. A person with psychosis might experience the following:

  • Hearing, smelling and seeing things that other people don’t
  • Saying things that seem strange to friends and family
  • Becoming withdrawn and isolated
  • Becoming suspicious that everything is about or related to them
  • Feeling that their thoughts are being controlled by someone or something else

This information has been collected from third party providers therefore the Reading Services Guide, Reading Borough Council (RBC) and Brighter Futures for Children (BFfC) cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy of this information and recommends that parents, carers, young people, residents and professionals check with providers regarding DBS (Disclosure & Barring Service) and OFSTED registrations and CQC registrations. Information collected by Reading Service Guide; is used solely to implement and supply the Family Information Service (FIS), Special Educational Needs & Disabilities - Reading's Local Offer, Adults & Carers Support Group and Reading Youth.

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