Skip to main content

Coronavirus

Due to the COVID-19 situation, some of the organisations listed on this site have posted service updates and will continue doing so. Many phone lines and websites are still available, however some contact details may have changed. Try the organisation's own website if you're having difficulty getting through.

If you have any queries, please email us at dos@reading.gov.uk or fis@reading.gov.uk

What is Cerebral Palsy?

Reading SEND Local Offer

What is Cerebral palsy?

Cerebral palsy is the name for a group of lifelong conditions that affect movement and co-ordination. It's caused by a problem with the brain that develops before, during or soon after birth.

Causes of cerebral palsy include:

  • an infection caught by the mother during pregnancy
  • a difficult or premature birth
  • bleeding in the baby’s brain
  • changes (mutations) in the genes that affect the brain's development

The symptoms of cerebral palsy normally become apparent during the first three years of a child's life.

The main symptoms are:

  • muscle stiffness or floppiness
  • muscle weakness
  • random and uncontrolled body movements
  • balance and co-ordination problems

These symptoms can affect different areas of the body and vary in severity from person to person. Some people will only have minor problems, whereas others will be severely disabled.

There is no cure for cerebral palsy. However, there are numerous treatments available, which can treat many of its symptoms and help people with the condition to be as independent as possible.

These treatments include physiotherapy, occupational therapy and medication to relieve muscle stiffness and spasms. In some cases, surgery may also be needed.

Cerebral palsy is not a progressive condition. This means the original problem in the brain doesn't get worse with age, and life expectancy is usually unaffected.

Updated May 2020